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Equipment

Dog agility is basically an assault course for dogs which is made up of various bits of equipment that need  to be negotiated over, round or through. In competition the course is done against the clock. The two main types of course are ‘Agility’, which makes use of contact equipment and ‘Jumping’ which does not.

Equipment can vary in specification, but all of the equipment used by Wight Wizards Agility is full size. Both UK Agility and the Kennel Club have there own, but similar specifications for competition agility equipment.

Contact Equipment

Contact equipment is so named as it features two zones at either end of the equipment that the dog must touch. These zone are a different colour to the main part of the obstacle to make the very clear to both the dog and handler.

The ‘A’ Frame is made up of two ramps which form an ‘A’ shape hence its name. Each ramp has a contact area at the base. The apex of the ‘A’ Frame is 1.7m (5’ 7”) from the ground.

The dog must ‘walk on’ to the ramp from the front, climb to top of the apex and then climb down the other side ensuring that the dog leaves the ‘A’ Frame at the base rather than the side. At least one of the dogs’ paws must touch each contact point.

'A' Frame

‘A’ Frame

The Dog Walk is made up of three planks 305mm (12”) wide, two of which form ramps at either end of the central plank which is 1.37m (4′ 6”) from the ground. At the base ends of the ramps there are contact areas.

The dog must ‘walk on’ to the ramp from the front, climb the ramp, traverse the middle plank, before descending at the other side and leaving the far plank by the end. Both contacts must be made by at least one of the dog’s paws.

Dog Walk

Dog Walk

The See – saw is a singular 305mm (12”) wide plank pivoted in the middle with ‘contact’ points on each end. The See-saws height at the central bracket is 685mm (2′ 3”).

The dog must ‘walk on’ to the See-saw by a straight approach, traverse the See-saw past the pivot point and then leave it by the end after it has touched the ground. Both contacts must be made by at least one of the dog’s paws.

See-saw

See-saw

Non-Contact Equipment

The Pipe Tunnel is a flexible tunnel that is at least 609mm (2’) in diameter and 3.05m (10’) long. Although the shape and length of the tunnel can be varied the diameter is constant throughout its length.

Dogs should run straight through the tunnel from one side to the other from whichever end is instructed by the handler. The Pipe Tunnel often proves a favourite with the dogs who will go through it at any opportunity, much to the handlers’ annoyance.

Pipe Tunnel

Pipe Tunnel

The Collapsible Tunnel is made up of a rigid entrance that is at least 483mm (1’ 7”) high and 457mm (1’ 6”) deep that leads into a ‘cloth’ tunnel. The minimum length of the whole obstacle is 3.05m (10’).

The dog should run straight through the opening of the tunnel pushing its’ way through the cloth and out the other end.

Collapsible Tunnel

Collapsible Tunnel

The Long Jump is made up of 3 – 5 evenly spaced planks. The number of planks used is dependant on the sizing of the dog. Marker poles are used in competition to mark the start and end of the jump.

The dog should jump over all the planks from front to back in one go without knocking any of them down.

Long Jump

Long Jump

The Hurdle (Jump) is usually made up of a pole and two supports. The height of the pole is determined by the size category that the dog falls into. The pole is easily displaced if hit by the dog.

The dog should complete the jump in the indicated direction, jumping over the pole without displacing it.

Hurdle

Hurdle

The Tyre (Hoop) aperture is 533mm (1’ 9”) and the height is adjustable on a fixed frame. The height is determined by the size category that the dog falls into.

The dog must jump through the Tyre in the indicated direction.

Tyre

Tyre

The Weave is made up of a minimum of 6 rigid poles to a maximum of 12 rigid poles with each pole being a set distance apart in a straight line.

Dogs are required to pass the first weave pole on their left shoulder and then should continue to weave their way through the poles until they reach the end. This is the most difficult piece of equipment for the dog to learn.

Weave

Weave